BRANFORD, Conn., April 21, 2009 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- CAS Medical Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq:CASM) today announced that four studies were presented at the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA) Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX on April 18-22, 2009, demonstrating the efficacy and accuracy of the FORE-SIGHT(r) Absolute Cerebral Oximeter. These observational studies show initial evidence of the relationships between low cerebral tissue oxygen saturation measured by FORE-SIGHT and: a) longer term post-surgical cognitive decline, b) increased time to extubation, c) increased length of ICU stay, and d) post operative complications following cardiac surgery. In addition, one study demonstrates the superior accuracy of the FORE-SIGHT system.

Andrew Kersey, President and CEO, stated, "We are pleased to see this quality data being reported by world renowned institutions such as Duke University Medical Center, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The volume of clinical evidence supporting our FORE-SIGHT technology in a variety of applications continues to grow. The Company expects additional studies to be published throughout the year, furthering our goal to make FORE-SIGHT a standard of care."

Clinical Study Highlights

Simultaneous Comparison of FORE-SIGHT and INVOS Cerebral Oximeters to Jugular Bulb and Arterial Co-Oximetry Measurements in Healthy Volunteers (1), led by Dr. David MacLeod of Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC, compared simultaneous measurements from two cerebral oximeters against the gold-standard of weighted invasive jugular bulb and arterial oxygen saturation measurements. This study indicated that FORE-SIGHT absolute cerebral tissue oxygen saturation measurements are three times more accurate than INVOS.

Decreased Forebrain Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Saturation is Associated with Cognitive Decline after Cardiac Surgery (2), a clinical evaluation led by Dr. David MacLeod at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC, examined the relationship of cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) measured by FORE-SIGHT to longer term post-operative cognitive decline 6 weeks post surgery. Subjects were given a battery of cognitive tests both before and 6 weeks after surgery for verbal memory and language comprehension, figural memory, attention and concentration, and psychomotor and processing speed. This observational study showed that decreased intraoperative SctO2 levels are potentially associated with longer term forebrain post-operative cognitive decline. It is believed that this was the first study to demonstrate initial evidence that longer term post-operative cognitive decline may be associated with decreased cerebral tissue oxygen saturation measured by cerebral oximetry.

Decreased Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Saturation during Aortic Surgery Increases Risk of Post-Operative Complications (3) was led by Dr. Gregory Fischer of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, NY. This study examined the relationship between decreased intraoperative cerebral tissue oxygen saturation values and post-operative complications following aortic surgery. This study indicated that decreased SctO2 values were potentially associated with major post-operative complications, prolonged extubation times, and increased ICU length-of-stay.

Continuous Monitoring of Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation during Cardiac Surgery in Adults with Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy: Preliminary Results (4), led by Dr. Brijen Johsi of The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD, demonstrated that cerebral oximetry using near infra-red spectroscopy provides accurate detection of the lower cerebral blood flow threshold in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

Further information about FORE-SIGHT and these clinical studies can be found at: www.cerebraloximetry.com.

(1) Simultaneous Comparison of FORE-SIGHT and INVOS Cerebral Oximeters to Jugular Bulb and Arterial Co-Oximetry Measurements in Healthy Volunteers. MacLeod D, Ikeda K, Vacchiano C, Duke University Medical Center, Durham NC. Abstract # SCA56

(2) Decreased Forebrain Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Saturation is Associated with Cognitive Decline after Cardiac Surgery. MacLeod D, White W, Ikeda K, Newman M, Mathew J, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. Abstract # SCA08

(3) Decreased Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Saturation during Aortic Surgery Increases Risk of Post-Operative Complications. Fischer G, Lin H, DiLuozzo G, Griepp R, Reich D, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York NY. Abstract # SCA54

(4) Continuous Monitoring of Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation during Cardiac Surgery in Adults with Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy: Preliminary Results. Johsi B, Brady K, Stearns J, Hogue C, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD. Abstract #SCA9

About CASMED(r) - Monitoring What's Vital

CAS Medical Systems, Inc. is a leading developer and manufacturer of medical devices for non-invasive patient monitoring. The Company's FORE-SIGHT Absolute Cerebral Oximeter is the first cerebral oximeter available with FDA clearance for non-invasive, continuous measurement of absolute cerebral tissue oxygen saturation for neonates, infants, children and adults. This information helps avert brain damage or death during surgery and in critical care situations by allowing clinicians to identify patients with dangerously low levels of cerebral oxygen and intervene to reverse the condition.

The Company's product lines include the high-acuity monitoring capabilities of the FORE-SIGHT Cerebral Oximeter; the bedside patient monitoring line of vital signs and cardio-respiratory monitoring products, proprietary non-invasive blood pressure measurement technology, and supplies and service including blood pressure cuffs and products for neonatal intensive care. CASMED products are designed to meet the needs of a full spectrum of patient populations worldwide, ranging from adults to pediatrics and neonates.

For further information regarding CAS Medical Systems, Inc., visit the Company's website at www.casmed.com.

The CAS Medical Systems, Inc. logo is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=4675

Statements included in this press release, which are not historical in nature, are forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Statements relating to the future financial performance of the Company are subject to many factors including, but not limited to, the customer acceptance of the products in the market, the introduction of competitive products and product development, commercialization and technological difficulties, the impact of actions and events involving key customers and vendors, and other risks detailed in the Company's Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 and other subsequent Securities and Exchange Commission filings.

Such statements are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the Company's management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. When used in this press release the terms "anticipate", "believe", "estimate", "expect", "may", "objective", "plan", "possible", "potential", "project", "will" and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are made as of the date hereof, and we do not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of future events, new information or otherwise.

CAS Medical Systems, Inc.
Susan Carron, Director of Corporate Communications
203-488-6056