Ten Spot Survey Reveals Managers Play a Role in The Great Resignation, as Nearly Half of Workers Have a Manager or Team Lead that Makes Them Want to Quit

New York, UNITED STATES


Nearly 8 in 10 Managers Say They Need the Training to Be Better Managers for Remote and Hybrid Work

61% of Employees are Concerned that Being Managed Remotely Puts Their Career Advancement Opportunities and Earning Potential in Jeopardy

59% of Gen Z Say They are Already Managing People or Teams

NEW YORK, Jan. 19, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Ten Spot, the workforce engagement platform that keeps your employees connected, today announced the results of its national employee survey, Employee Management in the Era of Hybrid & Remote Work. The findings provide insight into workers’ and managers’ perspectives about managing workers and being managed, in remote or hybrid work environments, shedding light on a wide range of concerns from workers and managers alike.

Is Your Company Experiencing The Great Resignation? The Managers Could Be Why
There are good managers, there are great managers, and then there are managers who make workers want to quit. Unfortunately, 46% of workers overall say they currently have a manager or a team lead that makes them want to quit their job. What’s even more staggering is that out of employees who are also managers, 81% say they want to quit because of their manager. For companies already struggling with retention, this isn’t great news.

Additionally, overall 61% of workers are concerned that both their career advancement opportunities and their earning potential are in jeopardy as a result of the remote relationship they have with their manager. When looking at the group of people who want to quit because of their manager, 78% are concerned their career opportunities are in jeopardy and 77% are concerned their earning potential is in jeopardy.

So, what’s the “why” behind workers wanting to quit because of their manager? Well, 67% say they have a good working relationship and good communication with their managers, so it’s not that. In fact, when these workers describe their manager’s management style since working remotely it’s first - organized (51%), second - relaxed (43%), and finally - micromanager (34%).

Micromanagement may be a key underlying issue, as when looking at all respondents, micromanager comes in fifth at 25% after organized (52%), relaxed (44%), confident (36%), and motivating (27%).

“While adapting to remote and hybrid work has been an adjustment for everyone, it appears to have really turned employee management and retention on its head,” said Sammy Courtright, Co-founder and Chief Brand Officer of Ten Spot. “It’s become painfully clear that managers know they aren’t doing a great job, and they desperately want, and need, training to both help them become better managers and to set a good example for the next generation of managers.”

Managers Are Desperate for Training on How to be Managers
The survey revealed that 78% of managers feel they need training on how to be better managers, particularly in hybrid and remote work environments. While not a direct comparison, it is a stark comparison to SHRM data announced in the midst of the pandemic, which indicated that 57% of workers thought their managers could benefit from training.

Additionally, nearly half (47%) of managers find it more difficult (26%) or exceptionally more difficult (21%) to manage people remotely. What they need the most to improve the remote work relationship that managers have with their direct reports and teams are training on how to best manage and build relationships with people remotely (35%) and understanding how to best keep their direct reports and team members on track and accountable for their work (28%).

Men Are Hyper Aware of How They Are Managing & Being Managed
Men are twice as likely to say they are finding it exceptionally more difficult to manage people remotely (27%) than women do (13%). Additionally, 10% more men (82%) than women (72%) say they need the training to become better managers in the era of hybrid/remote work.

Men (43%) are much more likely than women (24%) to say they want training on how to best manage and build relationships with people remotely, When it comes to men and women, twice as many men (27%) than women (13%) are finding it exceptionally more difficult to manage people remotely.

When it comes to being managed, more men (69%) than the overall average, and compared to only 51% of women, are concerned that their remote relationships with their managers are putting their career advancement opportunities and earning potential in jeopardy. As a result, men (30%) are almost twice as likely as women (17%) to have daily meetings with their managers about their job performance, career path, and professional development.

In spite of these concerns, men view their relationships in a much more positive and enthusiastic light than women do, as men (72%) are more likely than women (61%) to say they have developed a good working relationship and regular communication with their managers while working remotely. Additionally, 70% of men are far more likely than women (50%) to say that virtual social events held by their company helped them build bonds with their manager.

The Next Generations - Gen Z & Millennials - Are Already Managing From Behind
The Gen Z workforce is currently made up of 18 to 24 year-olds, and already 59% of Gen Z respondents say they are managing people or teams. Ironically, only 76% of this generation of managers say they need manager training, while it’s Millennials (81%) who rank as the generation that says it’s most in need of manager training.

Millennials are also concerned about their remote relationships with their managers, with 66% feeling their career advancement opportunities and 65% feeling their earning potential are in jeopardy because of them. However, Millennials (67%) are the most likely to find that virtual social events held by their companies help them build bonds with their managers, followed by Gen Z at 57%.

Gen Z is currently learning from managers who admit they are in need of manager training, yet is so eager for guidance and direction they appear to be idealizing their managers, describing them as organized (44%), relaxed (44%), motivating (29%), confident (28%), and secure (25%). Alternately, Gen Z is the generation most likely to have the most doubts about their current relationship and communication with their managers, as 31% say it’s okay, but could be better, and 19% say they don’t have a good relationship or good communication with their managers.

Survey Methodology
Ten Spot conducted its Employee Management in the Era of Hybrid & Remote Work Survey with 2,000 people who have been working from home since the pandemic began, between November 17 and November 18, 2021. The margin of error is +/- 2.08%.

About Ten Spot
Ten Spot is the workforce engagement platform that keeps your employees connected to each other - wherever they are. Its innovative software combines live and on-demand content with sophisticated tools that help companies measure employee engagement and sentiment. Ten Spot helps employees bond, chat, and connect with each other.

Companies that use Ten Spot have a dedicated space for socializing, sparking relationships, enhancing teamwork, and building and maintaining a strong company culture, helping improve productivity and reduce employee burnout. Ten Spot is designed to give every employee the same experience, no matter where they’re based, to more easily build team cohesion across multiple locations, time zones, and work styles. For more information visit www.tenspot.com

 

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