Study in July 2020 issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety

OAKBROOK TERRACE, Ill., June 25, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- There are many professional, cultural and structural barriers to teamwork, communication and patient engagement in hospital settings. The Institute of Medicine recommends interprofessional teams optimize communication and address patient care complexity.1

The Interprofessional Teamwork Innovation Model (ITIM) was developed and implemented at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, in January 2015. ITIM involves bedside rounds that include a bedside nurse, case manager or social worker, pharmacist and hospitalist with the aim to bring these providers together with patients and their families to discuss plan of care, treatment and discharge planning. Initial research documented that ITIM was associated with a reduction in 30-day readmissions to the hospital while it yielded a cost-neutral result from the implementation.

A new study in the July issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, “Patient Perceptions and Real-Time Observations of Bedside Rounding Team Communication: The Interprofessional Teamwork Innovation Model,” details findings after conducting observations and patient surveys in two hospital sites to examine relationships between observed teamwork structures, communication processes in the ITIM and clinical outcomes.

Researchers observed 68 ITIM teams that completed 685 patient visits in a 569-bed academic medical center (AMC) and an affiliated 302-bed community-based care hospital (CH). Patients also were asked to complete surveys about their experience with their ITIM team.

Findings showed team structures and communication processes were significantly associated with lower lengths of stay (LOS) in the CH, and communication processes were associated with lower LOS in the AMC. A variety of communication factors were operating in ITIM teams including the following:

  • Soliciting questions from patients and staff
  • Politeness
  • Rapport
  • Physician and nurse speaking percentages
  • Team-oriented communication

“Findings suggest that when patients feel they are given opportunities to ask questions, speak without being interrupted and have their questions answered, they tend to be satisfied with their experience of care,” note the study authors.

The 2019 John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award recipients also are featured in the July issue:

Other articles in the issue include:

For more information, visit The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety website

Note for editors
The article is “Patient Perceptions and Real-Time Observations of Bedside Rounding Team Communication: The Interprofessional Teamwork Innovation Model” by Kevin Real, PhD; Sarah Bell, MA; Mark V. Williams, MD; Barbara Latham, MSN, RN; Preetham Talari, MD; and Jing Li, MD, MS. The article appears in The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, volume 46, number 7 (July 2020), published by Elsevier.

The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety
The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety (JQPS) is a peer-reviewed journal providing health care professionals with innovative thinking, strategies and practices in improving quality and safety in health care. JQPS is the official journal of The Joint Commission and Joint Commission Resources, Inc. Original case studies, program or project reports, reports of new methodologies or the new application of methodologies, research studies, and commentaries on issues and practices are all considered.

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1 Institute of Medicine. To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2000.

Media Contact:      
Katie Bronk
Corporate Communications
(630) 792-5175
kbronk@jointcommission.org

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