New Report: Percentages of BIPOC Enrollees in U.S. Law Schools

Infographics show ranking of ABA-accredited law schools based on student

Tampa, Florida, UNITED STATES


TAMPA, Fla., Sept. 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Law school enrollment among students of color slowed in 2019, according to new data released by the American Bar Association on law school admissions. Enjuris, a legal resource for accident victims, compiled this data on law school enrollment by comparing schools and regions where law students of color are enrolled.

The racial and ethnic composition of law school enrollments is similar to the U.S. population, generally. However, the enrollment of Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) as a whole has decreased by small increments year-over-year, and continued to decline for the 4th consecutive year.

The incoming 2019 class included 31% of students who are historically underrepresented. The only race and ethnicity that increased were Asian and Hispanic/Latino students. All other races and ethnicities that the ABA tracks decreased slightly. Black students represented the largest decrease, though some schools managed to buck the trend.

The top 10 law schools by Black enrollment in 2019 were:

  1. Howard University (80.95%)
  2. Texas Southern University (59.79%)
  3. Southern University (57.55%)
  4. North Carolina Central University (54.12%)
  5. Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University (FAMU) (47.07%)
  6. University of the District of Columbia (45.87%)
  7. Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School (30.39%)
  8. Western Michigan University (22.40%)
  9. The University of Memphis (19.58%)
  10. UNT Dallas College of Law (16.53%)

Enjuris’ 2019 Law School Diversity Report also includes rankings of the top law schools for enrollment of Hispanic, Asian, Native American or Alaskan Native, and Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander students.

The Enjuris Women in Law School Report, released earlier this year, shows that there’s been a significant increase in female enrollment. There are a few prevailing theories about why this is different from the trend for students of color.

For more information, charts, infographics and data on BIPOC law school enrollment, visit the Enjuris Law School Diversity Report.

About Enjuris
Enjuris is a platform dedicated to helping people who are dealing with life-altering accidents and injuries. They support students, families, caregivers, and communities with resources, personal stories, and a national directory of injury lawyers.

Media Contact
Lance Buchanan
Executive Editor, Enjuris
(800) 366-1639
lance@enjuris.com

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/6168d5f6-5288-4128-a61d-48b08e731772.


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